Boardwalk Blazes New Path Along Schuylkill

When completed in 2014, the Schuylkill River Trail’s boardwalk will serve not only as a new corridor for pedestrians, cyclists and other visitors along enjoying the river, but will also offer users exciting new ways to experience Philadelphia’s forgotten waterfront spaces and vistas.

 

At about 2000 feet long and 15 feet wide, the new Schuylkill River Trail Boardwalk (pictured under construction on the left) runs just adjacent to the riverbank, seemingly floating above the Schuylkill as it connects the old trail head at Locust Street to a new one currently under construction under the South Street Bridge. Indeed, once complete, the boardwalk will allow residents of South Philadelphia easier access the Schuylkill River Trail while also avoiding dangerous active freight rail lines that run along Center City’s lower Schuylkill waterfront.

 

Lane Fike, director of capital programs at the Schuylkill River Development Corporation, recently told Philly.com that project is on track to be completed in August of 2014. In addition to the benefits it will bring Center City, the boardwalk will also serve as an important part of a $60 million project (funded with federal stimulus dollars) that aims to create bike paths running some 90 miles along the Schuylkill River from Philadelphia to Pottsville, Pennsylvania.

 

A rendering of the Schuylkill Riverbanks Trail Boardwalk (image by Schuylkill Banks)

 

Perhaps what’s most exciting though about the boardwalk on the Schuylkill Riverbanks Trail isn’t just the new bike and jogging space, but rather in brand new vistas and experiences it will afford visitors. The Schuylkill River is so heavily managed that can be hard to experience the natural surroundings of this green space; However, this project’s organic shape and position over the river will allow visitors to connect with the Schuylkill River in dynamic new ways.

 

We are of course always delighted to share with you and our clients projects like this, which take Philadelphia’s degraded, post-industrial spaces and breathe new life into them.